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The Civil War by Shelby Foote - V1.Chapter 3: The Thing Gets Under Way

The Civil War by Shelby Foote – V1.Chapter 3: The Thing Gets Under Way


As I’m reading Shelby Foote’s incredible The Civil War: A Narrative, these are my notes on the points I may have forgotten from before or new pieces I’ve learned. Any and all comments appreciated.

Previous post – Chapter 2         Next post – Chapter 4

Volume One: Chapter 3

  1. The West: Grant, Fort Henry
  2. Donelson – The Loss of Kentucky
  3. Gloom; Manassas Evacuation
  4. McC moves to the penisula

First Army/Navy cooperation occurs on a river?

  • From page 183: “In the lead were four ironclad gunboats, unlike any ever seen before on this or any river.”
  • From page 184: “The turtle-back steamers were not a navy project, the admirals left such harebrained notions to the army. For the most part, even the sailors aboard the boats were soldiers…Once the fleet was launched and manned, however, the navy saw its potential and was willing to furnish captains for its quarterdecks. Having made the offer, which was quickly accepted, the admirals did not hold back, but sent some of their most promising officers westward for service on the rivers.”

Initial victories by U.S. Grant (Hiram!)

  •  Grant takes Fort Henry and Fort Donelsom (with the help of navel river bombardment the first time, and with little bloodshed the second time)
  • The Confederate armies retreat out of Kentucky
  • From page 196: “The congressional appointment had identified him as Ulysses Simpson Grant, when in fact his given name was Hiram Ulysses, but rather than try to untangle the yards off red tape that stood in the way of correction – besides the risk of being nicknamed “Hug” – he let his true name go and took a new one: U. S. Grant.”

understanding Lincoln

  • Having just seen the movie Lincoln, this passage parallels the portrayal of the President as a man who has loyalties only to the cause of saving the Union and putting an end to slavery.
  • From page 247-248: “That was something else he never understood: Lincoln himself. Some might praise him for being flexible, while others called him slippery, when in truth they were both two words for just one thing. To  argue the point was to insist on a distinction that did not exist. Lincoln was out to win the war; and that was alone was out to do, for the president would keep his word to any man only so long as keeping it would help to win the war. If keeping it meant otherwise, he broke it. He kept no promise, anyhow, any longer than the conditions I under which it was given obtained. And if any one thing was clear in this time when treason had become a household word, it was that the conditions of three months ago no longer obtained. McCellan would have to go forward or go down.”
  • At this point, Lincoln unilaterally put forth General War Order No. 1, stating that a forward movement would be launched on February 22, much to McCellan’s chagrin.

 

The Civil War by Shelby Foote - V1.Chapter 1: Prologue-The Opponents

The Civil War by Shelby Foote – V1.Chapter 1: Prologue-The Opponents


As I’m reading Shelby Foote’s incredible The Civil War: A Narrative, these are my notes on the points I may have forgotten from before or new pieces I’ve learned. Any and all comments appreciated.

Next post: Chapter 2

Volume One: Chapter 1: Prologue

  1. Succession. Davis and Lincoln
  2. Sumter. Early Maneuvers
  3. Statistics North and South

Other states and even NYC talked about seceding from the Union;

  • From page 43: “…Lincoln was confronted with division even among the states that had stayed loyal. New Jersey was talking succession; so was California, which along with Oregon was considering the establishment of a new Pacific nation; so, even, was New York City, which beside being Southern in sentiment would have much to gain from independence.”
  • A new Pacific nation would certainly have mad getting the Union back together difficult. An interesting piece for an alternate history.

Interesting “adjustments” in the Confederate Constitution;

  • From page 42: “One important oversight was corrected, however. Where the founding fathers, living in a less pious age of reason, had omitted any reference to the Deity, the modern preamble invoked “the favor and guidance of Almighty God.” Nor were more practical considerations neglected. The President and Vice President were elected to a six-year term, neither of them eligible for reelection. Congress was forbidden to pass a protective tariff or to appropriate money for internal improvements. Cabinet officers were to be given seats on the floor of Congress. Each law must deal with only one subject, announced in its title, and the President had the right to veto separate items in appropriation bills. Instead of requiring a three-fourths majority, amendments could be ratified by two-thirds of the states. While the newer document expressly prohibited any revival of the slave trade, those chattels referred to in the old on as “persons” now became outright “slaved” and in all territory acquired by the Confederacy, slavery was to be “recognized and protested” by both the Federal and territorial governments.”

Fort Sumter somewhat backfired on Lincoln. The South attacked, and Lincoln used this as motive for putting out a call for 75,000 men. The border states did not join in the spirit of “uniting the North.”

  • From page 51: “Telegram after telegram arrived from governors of the previously neutral states, each one bristling with moral indignation at the enormity of the proclamation, rather as if it had been in fact an invitation to fratricide or incest.”
  • Virginia seceded with two days, Arkansas, North Carolina and Tennessee shortly after.

Olympic Gods assembled for Percy Jackson

Though I’d rather see Uma Thurman as Artemis, where she could employ her Kill Bill martial arts skills, this looks like an excellent cast.

Featuring Uma Thurman as Medusa and Pierce Brosnan as Chiron, Fox2000 has announced the actors playing the Olympic Gods in the forthcoming movie adaptation of The Lightning Thief, the first book in the PercyJackson and the Olympians series.

More details here.

Re-reading MSandT

Re-reading Tad William's Memory, Sorrow and Thorn

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Dusk Before the Dawn

Dusk Before the Dawn

Software By the Kilo

Software by the Kilo

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